Gallery Beat November 8

8 Nov

There are some great opportunities in New York right now for art-lovers, and you shouldn’t miss any of them. For this week’s Gallery Beat, we’ve got three very unique exhibits featuring art, and artists, who don’t often make their way across the pond. You’ll be feeling very European after checking these out:

Girl with a Pearl Earring

Girl with a Pearl Earring

Vermeer, Rembrandt, and Hals: Masterpieces of Dutch Painting from the Mauritshuis

Remember Scarlett Johannsen’s 1999 film, Girl with a Pearl Earring? Now you can see the original masterpiece at the center of that story. For the first time in 30 years, Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer is on display outside its home in the Netherlands. The Frick Collection is displaying the painting, along with other famous Dutch masterpieces, in an exhibit now through January 19. The paintings are from the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis in The Hague, which is currently undergoing a renovation.

Girl with a Pearl Earring was created sometime in the 17th century, and is inarguably Vermeer’s most famous piece. It is a beautiful and intense image of a young woman, with her stunningly large pearl earring as the focal point. It is well worth seeing in real life, so take the opportunity now.

The Frick Collection
1 E. 70th St.
New York, NY 10001
(212) 547-0641
Exhibit Jan. 19, 2014

Betende Hande, 1963.

Betende Hande, 1963.

Konrad Lueg

Konrad Lueg has a really interesting history. You would think this German postwar artist, one of the founding figures of “Capitalist Realism,” would be more famous. His work in the 1950s and 60s was considered the German counterpart to the American Pop art movement.

But Lueg abruptly quit his artistic pursuits in 1967, and went on to become one of Europe’s greatest contemporary art dealers instead. His early contributions to German art have not earned him much recognition.

Perhaps this new exhibit at the Greene Naftali Gallery with give him more credit. While Lueg’s career was short, this display of his work between 1963-1967 offers plenty to keep your attention. It also makes me want to see much more of him. His fascinating, abstract patterns and portraits, filled with rainbows of colors, are enthralling. I love Lueg’s unique addition to his artistic genre, and hopefully this exhibit is just the beginning of Lueg retrospectives.

Greene Naftali Gallery
526 W. 26th St., 8th Floor
New York, NY 10001
(212) 463-7770
Exhibit until Nov. 16

Jean Paul Gaultier’s “Barbès” women’s ready-to-wear fall-winter collection of 1984–85. © Paolo Roversi

Jean Paul Gaultier’s “Barbès” women’s ready-to-wear fall-winter collection of 1984–85. © Paolo Roversi

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

 The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier has been hitting the publicity waves for two years now- and it’s finally made its way to New York. It is the first international exhibition dedicated to the acclaimed and groundbreaking couture fashion designer.

Currently at the Brooklyn Museum, The Fashion World features 140 pieces of haute couture and prêt-à-porter ensembles, including some of Gaultier’s earliest and newest pieces.

What makes this exhibit really cool are its multimedia elements. According to the Brooklyn Museum, many of his fashions are displayed on “custom mannequins with interactive faces created by high-definition audiovisual projections.”

In addition, you can also view “accessories, sketches, stage costumes, excerpts from films, and documentation of runway shows, concerts, and dance performances, as well as photographs by fashion photographers and contemporary artists who stepped into Gaultier’s world.”

I can’t wait to step into it myself.

The Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY 11238
(718) 638-5000
Exhibit until Feb. 23, 2014

The Advent of Social Documentary Photography

23 Oct
Image via ICP

Circa 1906. Image via ICP

1910: A young boy in ragged clothes and bandages waits alone in front of the doctor’s office. 1906: A group of boys huddle together at midnight near the Brooklyn Bridge, selling newspapers to make any small living they can.

Lewis Hine’s photographs of poor and working children are among his most famous and acknowledged. His work embodied the life of thousands of ordinary Americans in the first half of the 20th century, and captured some of the most iconic images in American history. He is considered a pioneer of social documentary photography.

Circa 1910. Image via ICP

Circa 1910. Image via ICP

In two excellent new exhibits, the International Center of Photography examines Hine’s photographic career through both his famous and lesser-known works. Lewis Hine and The Future of America, running now through January 19, offer an inspiring and haunting glimpse at our country’s working-class past.

Beginning with his earliest photographs at Ellis Island in 1905, Lewis Hine follows with a selection of every major project of Hine’s career. This includes 1910’s “Hull House,” Post-World War I’s “American Red Cross in Europe” series, and 1932’s “Men at Work,” detailing the construction of the Empire State Building.

The second exhibit, The Future of America, documents Hine’s work as chief photographer for the National Research Project (NRP), a division of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the late 1930s. The least known of all Hine’s photographs, these captured working conditions in northeast industrial towns. The U.S. government used these photographs to help study industrial technologies and their effects on employment, effectively documenting the historic labor and industry transitions of the time period.

The two exhibits combined present over 200 photographs on loan from the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film.

Hine was trained as a sociologist, giving his photography a very keen insight into its subject matter. He is often compared to photographer Jacob Riis, the photojournalist who advocated for New York City’s working poor population.

Circa 1931. Image via ICP.

Circa 1931. Image via ICP.

Hine’s wider range of subjects, however, gives viewers a much more complex and intricate view of life in the early 20th century. The expansive material on view at the ICP is a perfect introduction to his work- spanning 30 years and several geographical eras. The images themselves are voyeuristic angles, yet objective in their frames. All of them are mesmerizing.

Hine was meticulous in the quality of his subjects and images. Looking at row after row of his work on display, you can see the care and precision he took into creating each shot. The people and the places and the scenes, often shot in action, make a long distance era seem not so long ago anymore.

Hine doesn’t need an expansive exhibit to prove his incredible influence on modern photography- but the ICP does his legacy great justice in these two collections.

Open House New York This Weekend!

11 Oct

This weekend will be unlike any other in New York City: for two days only, hundreds of museums, institutions, and private homes across all five boroughs will be open free for tours, talks, and visits. It is the 11th annual Open House New York.

Instead of my regular Gallery Beat to start off your weekend, I’m choosing some of my favorite “Open House” events or locations for you to see. New York is full of so much beautiful art, architecture, and history, and Open House is the perfect way for you to explore your neighborhood and city. A full list of events and participating places can be found at http://www.ohny.org, and here are my Top 10 Favorites that I’m still trying to choose from:

Image via Open House New York

Image via Open House New York

Wyckoff House Museum
5816 Clarendon Rd., Brooklyn
Open for tours Saturday and Sunday at 11am, 1pm, 3pm.
“Explore rarely seen areas of the Wyckoff Farmhouse and learn about the importance of cellars and attics to New Yorkers in the Colonial period.”

Image via Open House New York

Image via Open House New York

Museum
Cortlandt Alley/ Franklin St., Manhattan
Saturday and Sunday 11am- 7pm
“In a hidden alley in the back of a former paper warehouse, a freight elevator shaft-way is now NYC’s smallest museum containing 150 objects of overlooked humanism and beauty from the streets.”

Image via Open House New York

Mount Vernon Hotel Museum and Garden
421 E. 61st St., Manhattan
Sunday 11am- 4pm, tours on the hour
“One of Manhattan’s oldest buildings, this converted carriage house was a popular 19th-century country resort for New Yorkers escaping the crowded city, which at that time ended on 14th St.”

Image via Open House New York

Image via Open House New York

Berman Horn Studio
461 W. 153rd St., Manhattan
Saturday 2-6pm, tours every half hour
“This 19th-century building has been transformed to fit a 21st-century lifestyle, where architects Maria Berman and Bradley Horn work and live. Both the home and office are a testing ground for new design ideas and how to live respectfully within a historic structure.”

Image via Open House New York

Image via Open House New York

Khouri Studio Apartment
86 Forsyth St., 6th Floor, Manhattan
Saturday and Sunday 12-4pm
“Capitalizing on the stellar top-floor views, KGB created a small but well-formed apartment for one of its principals out of a former sweatshop space. One garment-making business still remains in the building.”

Image via Open House New York

Image via Open House New York

Lori Weitzner Loft
252 Seventh Ave., Apt. 3P, Manhattan
Saturday and Sunday 12-3pm
“A warm earthy palette, luxurious woven and printed fabrics, and hand-tufted carpets characterize textile designer Lori Weitzner’s family loft in the landmark Chelsea Mercantile Building. A magnetic linen wall covering in the kids’ bedroom lets her children practice decorating.”

Image via Open House New York

Image via Open House New York

Van Cortlandt House Museum
Broadway at W. 246th St., Bronx
Saturday and Sunday 11am- 4pm, tours throughout both days
“This Georgian fieldstone country house was once home to NYC’s prominent Van Cortlandt family, and was General George Washington’s headquarters in 1776 and 1783.”

Image via Open House New York

Image via Open House New York

Edgar Allen Poe Cottage
2640 Grand Councourse, Bronx
Saturday 10am-4pm; Sunday 1- 5pm
“Poe spent the last years of his life in this wooden farmhouse and it was where this prolific writer penned many of his poetical works, including ‘Annabel Lee’ and ‘The Bells’.”

Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum
895 Shore Rd., Bronx
Saturday and Sunday 12-4pm, tours. Sunday 4:30-6pm, lecture.
“This mansion’s gracious proportions, refined exterior stonework, cast-iron balconies, period millwork, and Greek Revival interiors exemplify country living in 19th-century Pelham Bay.”

Image via Open House New York

Image via Open House New York

Queens County Farm Museum
73-50 Little Neck Pkwy, Queens
Saturday and Sunday 10am-5pm; outdoor tour 2pm both days
“The city’s longest continually farmed site, this 47-acre area includes the Adriance Farmhouse, barns, a greenhouse, livestock pastures, planting fields, a small vineyard, and gardens.”

New York Gallery Beat September 27

27 Sep

(I know it’s been quite a while since I’ve posted a regular Gallery Beat up here, but now that fall is here and my crazy work hours are winding down, I’m hoping to get back into my old art-show groove!)

My favorite season is almost here, and what better way to kick it off with some beautiful (and noteworthy) gallery exhibits! This week’s Gallery Beat features some polar opposites to keep you awake and alert in this chilly weather. Travel to Paris for the opulence of Versailles, or explore the simplistic beauty of Planet Earth. For either mood, we’ve got the show for you.

Cabinet Interieur de Madame Victoire, Corps Central, Versailles. Image via Mary Boone Gallery.

Cabinet Interieur de Madame Victoire, Corps Central, Versailles. Image via Mary Boone Gallery.

Robert Polidori: Versailles

I am SO unbelievably excited about this exhibit- not only is it work from one of my favorite photographers, but the subject is also one of my favorite destinations!
Robert Polidori is known for his breathtaking shots of various human environments. Some of his most famous work includes scenes from Havana and Chernobyl. This special exhibit at the Mary Boone Gallery, however, features a more gilded and aristocratic setting: Versailles. The 17th century palace of France’s former monarchy underwent heavy renovations in the mid-1980s, and Polidori was granted an exclusive contract to document the restoration. His series of photographs were taken between 1985 and 2010, evoking “the aspirations and endeavors by both monarchs and laborers over past centuries.”
Similar to all of Polidori’s work, this collection is just as stunning. Brilliant and beautiful, his photographs teleport you to Versailles and immerse you in its wealth. So awe-inspiring. 

Mary Boone Gallery
745 Fifth Ave.
New York, NY 10151
(212) 752-2929
Exhibit until Oct. 26

Edward Hopper, Nighthawk. Image via Whitney Museum of American Art.

Edward Hopper, Nighthawk. Image via Whitney Museum of American Art.

Hopper Drawing

Edward Hopper (1882-1967) was an iconic American sketcher and painter. He depicted quintessential scenes from everyday American life- from the movie theater, the diner, the office, etc.
In Hopper Drawing, The Whitney Museum of American Art is housing the first major museum exhibit of Hopper’s works. The exhibit will include some of Hopper’s most famous paintings, like New York Movie (1939) and Nighthawks (1942), with their related preparatory drawings and other related works. There will also be archival research on the locations Hopper chose to inspire his art.
Compared with the magnificence of the last exhibit, the simplicity of this one is a nice balance. Hopper takes you back to a very different era than Versailles: early to mid-20th century America. His images of everyday life are smooth and calming, with a great mix of color and use of shading. After taking a tour of royal opulence, this exhibit will make you long for a simple weekend getaway. I love both ideas.

The Whitney Museum of American Art
945 Madison Ave.
New York, NY 10021
(212) 570-3600
Exhibit until Oct. 6

Bourgoyen Early Autumn. Image via Julie Saul Gallery.

Bourgoyen Early Autumn. Image via Julie Saul Gallery.

Catherine Nelson: Other Worlds

Catherine Nelson’s exhibit at the Julie Saul Gallery is rooted in natural, not human-made scenery. In Other Worlds, the British artist takes photographic images of nature and reconstructs thousands of little details into singular tableaux. With the globe as a central platform, each tableau represents a different season or natural environment, conveying “each environ simultaneously as both boundless and isolated.”
The detail in these images is absolutely stunning. I love how perfectly the globe and all its pieces fit onto the canvas and fill the space. It’s hard to believe these images are, essentially, elaborate photo collages. They look much more like paintings than photographs, but that adds all the more to their allure.
Nelson has a history of working on detailed projects- she worked on both the Moulin Rouge and Harry Potter films. Perhaps that’s where she was inspired to create these beautiful fantasies.

Julie Saul Gallery
535 W. 22nd St., 6th Floor
New York, NY 10011
(212) 627-2410
Exhibit until Oct. 19

 

Berlin Art Scene Heading to New York

24 Sep
Image via Cherrymuffin Studios

Image via Cherrymuffin Studios

There is much more to Berlin than the Berlin Wall.

Few people can associate anything else with this European capital, but that is fast changing.  Berlin today is booming with some of the freshest avant-garde art, music, and film in the EU.

Of course, New York just couldn’t miss out. So to bring Berlin to the Big Apple, the National Arts Club in Gramercy is hosting East Berlin: Film, Fashion, and Fotography from Sept. 25- Oct. 1. The show will meld Berlin’s incredible history and contemporary art scene together with a series of art exhibits, film screenings, and cocktail parties- plus a fashion show and history lecture to boot.

Don’t miss this opportunity to immerse yourself in Europe’s hippest art scene.

NAC member Erik Carlson spent the last two years planning the event, after being inspired at a friend’s dinner party in- you guessed it- Berlin.

“This friend and her husband live in a former penitentiary that’s been converted into condos,” Carlson said. “They had a dinner party and invited friends over, and over the course of the dinner people were talking about what artists they were interested in, (what artists inspired them, etc.,) and I thought that would make a great exhibition.”

Image via Madame Peripetie Photography

Image via Madame Peripetie Photography

Berlin is known as a city of reinvention. It had to rebuild itself from scratch twice in modern history- after World War I and after World War II. The end of communism and the reunification of Germany in 1990 was another major turning point in the city’s history.

Carlson carefully chose ten Berlin artists, whose work he admired, to display at the festival. While most of the artists will exhibit contemporary work, each one lived in former communist Berlin and experienced that era of artistic oppression.

“I would like everybody to have a better awareness of what was happening pre-1989 and see there’s more to Berlin’s history than just the Berlin Wall, ” Carlson said. “[Berlin] still has a bohemian flair, a post-apocalyptic flair. I think this exhibition will show people there are really creative thinkers and extraordinary talents coming out of Berlin today. It’s really becoming the art center of Europe.”

Art will be on continuous display in the NAC’s lower galleries, while special events will take place nightly on the upper floors.

Fashion via Gregor Marvel

Fashion via Gregor Marvel

The opening night will be a cocktail party connecting guests directly to Berlin. Via a video conferencing system, guests at the NAC will connect to guests at the Friendly Society, a Berlin art gallery and design space. Friendly Society owners, Gregor Marvel and Christian Heinrich, are two of the artists selected to show their work at the show. Heinrich does collage art while Marvel is a fashion and accessory designer.

It will be an “international cocktail party broadcast in real time,” Carlson said.

The concluding event on Tuesday, October 1 will be a lecture by German cabaret expert Adrienne Haan and NAC member Lynn Mayocole, discussing music and art deemed “degenerate” by Germany’s government in the 1930s up through 1990.  It will be a fascinating look at the historic environment that helped shape Berlin’s modern art culture.

A full schedule of events and list of participating artists are available on the NAC website. You can also view event updates through East Berlin’s Facebook page. There is already a wait list for Friday, Sept. 27’s cabaret party, but all other events are free and open to the public.

East Berlin: Film, Fashion, Fotography is an event unlike any other in New York City this Fall. New York’s art scene is already buzzing about it, and I won’t miss it for the world.

National Arts Club
15 Gramercy Park South
New York, NY 10003
(212) 475-3424

Consumer Envy Goes Overboard in The Bling Ring

29 Jun

the-bling-ring

Nothing epitomizes celebrity worship and consumerism quite like this.

Sophia Coppola’s newest film, The Bling Ring, is an excellent, humorous, and sad portrayal of consumer envy gone overboard- and our culture’s obsession with excess.

Based on the 2010 Vanity Fair article The Suspects Wore Louboutins” by Nancy Jo Sales, The Bling Ring follows a group of teenagers arrested for burglarizing celebrity homes in Hollywood in 2008 and 2009.

Marc (Israel Broussard) is a new kid trying to adjust to a new school in Agoura Hills, California, just outside Los Angeles. Rebecca (Katie Chang) is the cool, sophisticated, and stylish queen bee who takes him under her wing. The two become close friends.

Rebecca quickly introduces Marc to her favorite pastime: checking unlocked cars for cash and other goods. Marc idolizes her confidence and style, and he goes along with her lead. Before long, the two have moved from checking cars to checking houses.

After reading that Paris Hilton will be out of town for a party, Rebecca gets an even bolder idea: “let’s go to Paris.” She’s probably so stupid she keeps a key under her front mat.

Ka-ching.

Rebecca and Marc make off with jewelry, clothes and cash from Paris’ home. Emboldened by their successful heist, the pair, along with three other girlfriends, eventually go back to Paris’ home at least six times. They use news reports to track down and rob other out-of-town celebrities too, like Rachel Bilson, Meghan Fox, Lindsey Lohan, and Orlando Bloom.

There is no sense of guilt in taking other people’s possessions, or invading their private homes. Rebecca often chooses to rob people based on their wardrobe, which she wants for herself.

The shallowness of these teenagers is hard to ignore- their lives revolve around what clothes they wear, who their friends are, and what clubs they can get into. When their felony habits finally catch up to them, they get exactly what they want: fame and glory.

“America has this sick fascination with a Bonnie and Clyde kind of thing,” Marc would later tell police.

Coppola does a very sophisticated illustration of this true story. Although it would be easy to satirize and laugh at the ridiculousness of this all, Coppola instead does a very straightforward depiction of the real-life events and the characters in it. The true story is so ridiculous it doesn’t need embellishment.

These teenagers are only 18, 19 years old. They’re wearing Louboutins, Chanel, and Marc Jacobs, carrying Birkins and Louis Vuittons on their arms. Their clothes, and the attention they get from their perceived “status,” are their whole lives.

Materialism is the major theme of this film, and Coppola makes that clear. The Bling Ring is full of close-up shots of the jewelry, clothes, cash and “bling” these kids pull off.

“I just think we wanted to be part of the lifestyle, the lifestyle everyone wants,” Marc said. His statements are a haunting reminder of what some people in this country will do for fame, fortune, or image.

With great acting by all involved, particularly Emma Watson as Rebecca’s friend Nikki, The Bling Ring is another successful Coppola film. Without a great cast to accurately reflect the shallowness and shortsightedness of these teens, the film would have fallen flat. But Coppola’s role choices were perfect, and paired with great visual scenes and a hip soundtrack, this is a film worth seeing (and thinking about).

New York Gallery Beat June 22

22 Jun

This week’s Gallery Beat has an art form I’ve never featured before: wood crafting. I’m pretty excited about it, because the art really blew me away. I’ve also got some inspiring women’s fashion from Shanghai and proto-pop art from the ‘60s.  There’s a lot of cool stuff that will make you want to pick up a craft or travel across the world. I sure want to.

Image via Museum of Art & Design

Image via Museum of Art & Design

Against the Grain

When you think of different art forms, the art of wood crafting isn’t often at the top of your list. But this new exhibit at the Museum of Arts & Design proves just how artistically talented woodcrafters are. Featuring 90 installations, sculptures, furniture and other objects, Against the Grain “emphasizes the way artists, designers, and craftspeople have incorporated postmodernist approaches and strategies into woodworking.” The results are pretty cool to look at, and wonder “how did they do that?” From conceptual rocking chairs to platform shoes, there is a really interesting variety of creations. It definitely made me more interested in the craft, and have more appreciation of the culture. Woodcrafters have some great ingenuity.

Museum of Arts & Design
2 Columbus Circle
New York, NY 10019
(212) 299-7777
Exhibit until Sept. 15

Image via Museum of Chinese in America

Image via Museum of Chinese in America

Shanghai Glamour: New Women 1910s- 1940s

Shanghai, once known as the “Paris of the East,” is a city of exoticism and intrigue. Becoming a major metropolitan city in the early 1920s, it was renowned worldwide for its seduction and mystery. Shanghai women were particularly revered for their fashionable dress and sophistication. Shanghai Glamour, an exhibit at the Museum of Chinese in America, explores Shanghai women’s fashion and gender roles from the 1910s-1940s. The exhibit features 12 gorgeous outfits from the period, on loan from the China National Silk Museum in Hangzhou and in the U.S. for the first time. There are also more than 50 accessories, posters, lifestyle magazines, and period images on display.

“The exhibition examines how Shanghai women initiated styles that expressed their identities in relation to the city and how each archetype of femininity came to be associated with a certain characteristic Shanghai look.”

After seeing this exhibit, Shanghai has skyrocketed on my travel list. Beautiful scenery, beautiful women, and beautiful fashion. You can’t get more inspiring than that!

Museum of Chinese in America
215 Centre Street
New York, NY 10013
(212) 619- 4785
Exhibit until Sept. 29

Image via Luxembourg & Dayan

Image via Luxembourg & Dayan

Martial Raysse 

This is the first U.S. exhibit in 40 years dedicated to artist Martial Raysse. The French artist was known for his proto-pop art paintings and sculptures during the Cold War era. This exhibit focuses on the first 15 years of Raysse’s career, featuring his assemblages, paintings, sculptures, and experimental films. Raysse was critical of the Warhol pop-art movement, and therefore used his art as a form of critique. There are a lot of bright colors and image collages in this exhibit, which are always cool in my opinion. My favorites though are the collages with the neoclassical figures- as you can see in the picture above. But there are many more great images, so check them out when you get the chance. You never know when these works will be in the U.S. again.

Luxembourg & Dayan
64 E. 77th St.
New York, NY 10075
(212) 452-4646
Exhibit until July 13

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 755 other followers